Oculus TV Is Like Wearing a Living Room on Your Face, Which Is Weird

We're one step closer to disembodied floating heads

By Tanner Garrity

 
Oculus TV Is Like Wearing a Living Room on Your Face, Which Is Weird
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25 June 2018

Unless you’re stupid wealthy, a head of state, or Bill Murray, you probably don’t have a home theater with a 180-inch flat screen.

But democratization has a way of catching up to even the most luxurious commodities.

Introducing Oculus TV, a VR television service and (free) app, which just launched for the Oculus Go. The Go, quick refresher, is that pared-down, standalone VR headset that retails for $200-250. Already a reputable device for gamers — I’ve tested out “Coaster Combat” in the past; you ride in a treacherous roller coaster as a wizard or pirate and blast targets/duck incoming fire, it’s super fun —  this move is a clear attempt on the part of Oculus and its parent company Facebook to prove VR headsets should be used for TV streaming.

Oculus TV includes access to Pluto TV, MLB Live games via Facebook watch and Red Bull TV … all from “within” a home theater that features a cinema-quality screen. You can also launch Netflix, Showtime and Hulu from the app (though they’re not technically part of Oculus TV), for streaming shows you’re probably more familiar with.

Will the thing take? Who knows. It’s worth the try for Oculus, in this King Content era. Oculus TV doesn’t have to include direct access to the best shows; it just needs people to know that watching TV in its approachably priced headset is now an option. And using the thing in the right setting (at home, everyone else is asleep) instead of out and about (Gate 25, aaand your flight just left) could make it a welcome addition to your streaming arsenal.

Find more information on the app here, and purchasing options on your own Oculus Go here.

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