The $85M 'Great Gatsby' Mansion Oughta Make for One Helluva Housewarming

Start counting your pennies, Old Sport

By Alex Lauer

 
The $85M 'Great Gatsby' Mansion Oughta Make for One Helluva Housewarming
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10 April 2017

We’re four years out from Baz Luhrmann’s film adaptation of The Great Gatsby. The main pop culture takeaway? GIFs. Particularly of the opening party scene. Even more specifically, Leo DiCaprio toasting while fireworks explode behind him.

Finally, that can be you. If you’ve got $85 million.

That’s the asking price for one of the Long Island mansions that inspired Gatsby’s manor in the movie, according to Trulia. Built in 1928 and boasting 18 bedrooms and 32 bathrooms between a main residence and two guest houses, the estate doesn’t disappoint either Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age novel or Luhrmann's CGI-soaked film.

Gatsby Mansion (6 images)

The one upside to sticker shock is that in 2015 the asking price was $100 million. So when you factor in the extravagant amenities — outdoor pool with a slide and swim-up bars, indoor lazy river, tennis court, wine cellar and tasting room, fountain-lined driveway, shooting range, bowling alley, casino, a hydraulic lift-equipped garage, etc. — this is actually a steal.

But don’t go searching for this specific house in the movie. Since it was mostly shot in Australia, according to Architectural Digest, the Gothic Revival building of the former St. Patrick’s Seminary in Sydney was used for exterior shots of Gatsby’s pad. In true Baz style, the building was significantly enhanced in post-production, which is where this mansion comes in.

Gatsby Mansion 2 (5 images)

That said, Gatsby references abound. The residence is located on the water in Kings Point, on the Great Neck Peninsula, which served as the inspiration for Fitzgerald’s fictional West Egg. It was built at the tail end of the Roaring Twenties. And the waterfront includes a private pier that extends out long enough to hold a 200-foot yacht.

No confirmation on whether or not there’s a green light in the distance. But hey, that’s just a metaphor, people.

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