TV | June 6, 2022 10:25 am

Wonder Woman Is the Newest Bi Icon

According to Lynda Carter, the superhero is a member of the LGBTQ+ community

Lynda Carter crosses her wrists in the Wonder Woman pose as she is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, April 3, 2018, in Hollywood, California.
Lynda Carter crosses her wrists in the Wonder Woman pose as she is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, April 3, 2018, in Hollywood, California.
ROBYN BECK via Getty

Happy Pride Month to one member of the bisexual community — Wonder Woman. 

Lynda Carter, the actress best known for playing Wonder Woman in the iconic 1970s TV show, defended the character from bigots after posting fan art for Pride month. One user commented that the character “IS NOT A SUPER HERO FOR GAYS!” leading Carter to respond that she was “a character for bisexuals,” linking to an interview with one of the comic’s writers from 2016.

In the Polygon interview in 2016, Wonder Woman comics writer Greg Rucka confirmed the character’s bisexuality, saying that the island the Amazons are from is “supposed to be paradise.” “You’re supposed to be able to live happily,” he explained. “You’re supposed to be able — in a context where one can live happily, and part of what an individual needs for that happiness is to have a partner — to have a fulfilling, romantic and sexual relationship. And the only options are women. But an Amazon doesn’t look at another Amazon and say, ‘You’re gay.’ They don’t. The concept doesn’t exist. Now, are we saying Diana has been in love and had relationships with other women? As Nicola and I approach it, the answer is obviously yes.”

Wonder Woman is far from alone as an LGBTQ+ character in a superhero universe; Loki (portrayed by Tom Hiddleston in the MCU) has been canonically confirmed as bi or pansexual, and Zoe Kravitz confirmed that her Catwoman in this year’s The Batman had been in a romantic relationship with a woman.

Carter went on to post more LGBTQ+ fan art of the character, and she included links to donate to causes like PFLAG and TransLifeline, writing, “if you want to argue that she is somehow not a queer or trans icon, then you’re not paying attention…Every time someone comes up to me and says that WW helped them while they were closeted, it reminds me how special the role is.”