Sports | April 16, 2020 9:43 am

Hall-of-Fame Pitcher Roy Halladay Was on Drugs When Plane Crashed

Halladay was using his Icon A5 to do extreme acrobatics prior to losing control of the plane

Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies delivers a pitch in 2010. (Jim McIsaac/Getty)
Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies delivers a pitch in 2010. (Jim McIsaac/Getty)
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At the time of his fatal small plane crash in November of 2017 off the coast of Florida, Hall-of-Fame pitcher Roy Halladay had drugs in his system, according to a National Transportation Safety Board report issued Wednesday.

In addition to a high level of amphetamine, Halladay’s blood also contained heightened levels of morphine and an anti-depressant that can impair judgment.

The NTSB report also found Halladay was using his Icon A5 to do extreme acrobatics prior to losing control of the plan, including steep climbs and tight turns that sometimes brought the aircraft within five feet of the water below.

During his final maneuver, Halladay entered a steep climb that dropped the plane’s speed to about 85 miles per hour. That drop sent the propeller-driven plane into a nosedive into the ocean.

While the report doesn’t state why the 40-year-old lost control of the two-seat aircraft or list a cause for the crash, it does say he died of blunt force trauma and drowning, citing a medical examiner.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame posthumously last year, Halladay was an eight-time All-Star and two-time Cy Young Award winner with the Blue Jays and Phillies, going 203-105 with a 3.38 ERA during his 16 years in the majors.

His widow Brandy responded to the NTSB’s report through comments released by Major League Baseball:

“Yesterday’s NTSB report on Roy’s accident was painful for our family, as it has caused us to relive the worst day of our lives. It has reinforced what I have previously stated, that no one is perfect. Most families struggle in some capacity and ours was no exception. We respectfully ask that you not make assumptions or pass judgement. Rather, we encourage you to hug your loved ones and appreciate having them in your lives. As a family, we ask that you allow Roy to rest in peace.”

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