Brooklyn SolarWorks Wants to Make Solar Energy an NYC Reality

And you won’t even have to give up your rooftop chilling space

By Shari Gab

Brooklyn SolarWorks Wants to Make Solar Energy an NYC Reality
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08 May 2018

Rooftop access in NYC lends itself to many things: great parties, mediocre gardens, graffiti.

One thing those small, flat city rooftops aren’t so suited for? Solar.

But Brooklyn SolarWorks is out to change that, with a line of sleek, design-minded solar panel “canopies” they can install just about anywhere.

Designed by Situ Studio and produced in Warwick, Rhode Island, SolarWorks’ canopies are built on a simple design principle that makes them impervious to the city’s stringent fire and building codes: they’re elevated above the roof’s actual surface, meaning you don’t even have to forfeit your precious chilling space to erect them.

To get started, simply reach out to a BSW consultant to chat about your home and whether it qualifies. From they’re they’ll spec out the build and send you can estimate — the average cost of installation usually runs somewhere on the order of $35,000-$40,000. But once you factor in the tax incentives for solar installation, you’re looking at about an $8,000-$10,000 outlay … and that’s before you start reaping the benefits of lower energy costs.

Brooklyn SolarWorks (3 images)

And if you’re a renter (read: most of us)? Don’t despair. According to Brooklyn SolarWorks CEO T.R. Ludwig, the community solar rule allows owners to install solar and allocate the energy generated to multiple utility accounts.

If your landlord is on the fence, just remind him or her that the NYS Energy Research and Development Authority plans to add an incentive specifically for canopies in the coming months. The tenants get lower energy bills, the building owner gets the tax credits. Everyone wins.

Brooklyn SolarWorks is currently licensed to take on project in all five boroughs. If you’d like to learn more, their team will be setting up shop at the Brooklyn Designs event May 11th-13th at the Brooklyn Museum.

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