Sports | January 5, 2021 12:12 pm

Ex-Golf Channel Host Lisa Cornwell Alleges Network Execs Mistreated Women

Cornwell made the accusations during an appearance on the "No Laying Up" podcast

Golf Chanel host and reporter Lisa Cornwell poses on the red carpet in 2016.
Golf Chanel host and reporter Lisa Cornwell poses on the red carpet in 2016.
Sam Greenwood/Getty

After hinting she was ready to drop bombshells on social media, former Golf Channel host and reporter Lisa Cornwell accused her former employer of mistreating women, including herself, during an appearance on the No Laying Up podcast.

Cornwell, who worked her final day at the Golf Channel on December 20, had her contract expire on January 1. To mark the occasion, she took to Twitter and indicated she was ready to talk about her time at the network.

“The first day in 7 years I’m not in a contract w/Golf Channel & am free to speak up for the many women who’ve been marginalized, belittled, berated & treated like second class citizens — including me,” she wrote on Twitter. “The days of it being swept under the rug are over. #MoreToCome”

Then, accompanied by her lawyer Tom Mars, Cornwell appeared on No Laying Up to discuss her time at the Golf Channel, which is owned by NBC.

During her appearance on the podcast, the 44-year-old discussed being removed as host of Golf Channel’s coverage of the NCAA women’s golf championship in 2019 without cause, getting reprimanded for reporting a female golfer had to buy her own clubs rather than having them provided by a supplier and revealed she has filed a gender discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

According to Cornwell, her tweet about Lin led to her being sent home from the tournament and a harsh scolding from her male boss.

“A man, in his 60s, who was my boss, screaming and cussing me out and sending me home over a gender-related issue from a women’s golf tournament during the middle of a retaliation, gender-discrimination, EEOC case,” she said on the podcast. “I don’t know what organization allows that to happen but Golf Channel didn’t do anything about it.”

Following that incident, Cornwell claims the Golf Channel never allowed her to interview another LPGA player on live television again, despite covering two majors later on in the year.

Despite the alleged mistreatment, which an NBC Sports spokesperson declined to discuss when asked for a comment by Golfweek, Cornwell said other women at the network had it far worse than she did during her seven years at the Golf Channel.

“What I went through, and obviously I made it a female issue, a women issue, is nothing compared to what dozens and dozens of women at that network have faced over the years. That’s first and foremost to me,” Cornwell said. “This isn’t about being a victim.”