Sports | December 15, 2022 11:33 am

It Appears Aaron Rodgers Is a Confirmed Y2K Conspiracy Guy

Rodgers said "there was a lot of weird sentiment around Y2K." Did anyone (but him) believe it?

Aaron Rodgers is happy after a successful 2-point conversion against the Bears.
Aaron Rodgers is kind of, maybe, possibly, a nut.
Michael Reaves/Getty

While there’s no real way to know if Aaron Rodgers, who has guided the Packers to a 5-8 record in his 18th season in the NFL, will return to the Packers next year, it’s a fair assumption that it will be on his own terms if he does.

Rodgers, who just turned 39, has marched to the beat of his own drum for a long time, something he reinforced with some comments he made on a recent appearance on The Pat McAfee Show. The star quarterback, who has previously alluded to going through a cleansing process that involved forced vomiting, nasal clearance, digestive clearance and bloodletting, was once again talking about using ayahuasca, an experience he’s previously credited with helping him win back-to-back MVP awards following the 2020 and 2021 seasons.

This time, Rodgers gave praise to the plant-based psychedelic for helping him overcome a fear of death, a terror he apparently developed as a teenager when Y2K was approaching at the end of the 1990s. “I had a major fear of death… there was a lot of weird sentiment around Y2K, remember that? The world was going to end,” Rodgers said. “For me personally, since I was a young teenager, I was like, ‘Man if the world ends and I’m 16, I’m not going to be able to accomplish anything I want to accomplish.’ [Ayahuasca] relieved a lot of the stress around the idea of needing to accomplish things before I actually die, kind of taking away some of that fear. I think when you’ve seen the other side, it makes the idea as more of a passage and less of an ending. More of just kind of the next chapter of life.”

For those that don’t remember, a very small segment of people were worried that the world as we knew it was going to shut down when electronic calendars flipped from 1999 to 2000 because of the way that dates had been entered into computer systems. As it turned out, worldwide infrastructure was fine and no major crisis occurred.

Based on what Rodgers allegedly told former Green Bay quarterback DeShone Kizer when he first joined the Packers, it completely checks Rodgers would be a Y2K person because he certainly seems to be into conspiracy theories. According to Kizer, Rodgers (who was also an anti-vaxxer) brought up 9/11 as soon as he entered the locker room.

“He shut the door and the first thing that came out of Aaron Rodgers’s mouth was, ‘Do you believe in 9/11?,’” Kizer told The Breneman Show. He was like, ‘You should read up on that.’ What it ended up being was a thought experiment where he wanted me to go back and look into some of the conspiracies around it.”

Kizer didn’t reference Y2K, but he did go on to reference inner Earth, the moon landing and reptile people.

Good stuff.