By Jake Greenberg / September 5, 2018

Is The ISS Air Leak The Result of a Production Defect or Sabotage?

The hole has been patched from inside the module, but the mystery of its origin lingers.

Russia's Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft carrying the members of the International Space Station (ISS) expedition 56/57, NASA astronaut Serena Aunon-Chancellor, Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev and German astronaut Alexander Gerst, blasts off to the ISS from the launch pad at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome on June 6, 2018. (Photo by Vyacheslav OSELEDKO / AFP)        (Photo credit should read VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images)
Russia's Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft carrying the members of the International Space Station (ISS) expedition 56/57, NASA astronaut Serena Aunon-Chancellor, Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev and German astronaut Alexander Gerst, blasts off to the ISS from the launch pad at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome on June 6, 2018. (Photo by Vyacheslav OSELEDKO / AFP) (Photo credit should read VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images)

The mystery of the air leak on the Russian Soyuz module currently held at the International Space Station remains unsolved, as Russian officials are considering both productions defects and outright sabotage as possible causes. According to a story in The Guardian, the Russian space agency Rosmocos has launched an investigation.

The hole appears to be the work of a drill, and the head of Rosmocos, Dmitry Rogozin, has stated that “there were several attempts at drilling.” When the non-life threatening hole was detected last Thursday, the astronauts onboard sealed the leak with tape.

The investigation covers both possible explanations: that the drilling error took place at Energiya, the company that makes the module, or that the drilling was done in space as an act of sabotage.

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