By Jake Greenberg / September 13, 2018

Archaeologists Have Found 800 Previously Unknown Tombs in Egypt

The ancient graves, outside the village of Lisht, may shed light on the Middle Kingdom.

Pyramid of Amenemhet I, el-Lisht, Egypt. Egyptian civilisation, Middle Kingdom, Dynasty XII. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
Pyramid of Amenemhet I, el-Lisht, Egypt. Egyptian civilisation, Middle Kingdom, Dynasty XII. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)

Recent archaeological work has revealed an astounding 802 previously unexplored tombs underneath the desert outside the village of Lisht in Egypt. A new story in National Geographic investigates the significance of the necropolis, which dates back 4,000 years and likely entombed 4,000 people.

The findings will hopefully provide new information about the lives of people living in Itj-Tawy, which once existed near where the tomb lies, and served as the capital of the Middle Kingdom. What particularly excited researchers is the potential to learn more about the common people of Itj-Tawy, as most of the previously-known tombs held only royals.

Looters have taken a toll on the tombs, leaving less for the researchers to study. Nevertheless, the bountiful discovery has major implications for the way we understand the Middle Kingdom.

Daily Brief

15 Things to Know Today, from RealClearLife

April 17, 2019 April 16, 2019