Turns Out Whole Milk Isn’t Really Any Worse for Your Love Handles Than Skim

Full-fat dairy fans are less obese, way less diabetes-prone

By The Editors

Turns Out Whole Milk Isn’t Really Any Worse for Your Love Handles Than Skim
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11 April 2016

Drinking whole milk is horrible for you, they said.

Switch to skim if you want to live, they said.

But then some researchers analyzed blood taken from 3,333 adults over the course of 15 years and decided that’s a bunch of hooey: in the study, people who consumed full-fat dairy had a 46% lower risk of getting diabetes than those that didn’t.

They also had an 8% lower rate of obesity risk.

While the exact link between whole milk and a lower risk for diabetes is unclear, studies have found that people often ingest more sugar and carbohydrates when they reduce their fat intake.

“I think these findings together with those from other studies do call for a change in the policy of recommending only low-fat dairy products,” says researcher Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian. “There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy.”

To be clear, Mozaffarian and his colleagues aren’t advocating to replace insulin with whole milk, but they do think the Hester Prynne-ian stigma surrounding consuming full-fat dairy should be removed.

The study is also further evidence of the obvious-but-worth-stating notion that adding or removing a single item from your diet is a stupid, no-good, horribly misguided way to try to eat healthier or lose weight.

Due to its prowess as a hangover cure, we’re already partial to whole milk, so this calls for a celebration.

Sundaes, anyone?

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