This Handcrafted Lounge Chair Is Built to Age Perfectly

Don’t like how it looks? Reconfigure it.

By Kirk Miller

Campbell Chair Lounge
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27 March 2018

You might want to sit down for this.

No, really: this is a chair you’re going to spend a lot of time in.

It’s the Campbell Lounge, new from Sean Woolsey, the California furniture designer responsible for our favorite bar cabinet and the world’s prettiest shuffleboard table. All of Sean’s work utilizes the ideas of wabi-sabi, a Japanese philosophy that “recognizes the beauty in imperfect things which bear the imprint of time.”

This chair, however, is kind of perfect.

Forged with a tubular steel frame, nylon strapping and leather belts to support the two loose memory foam cushions, the Campbell is named after Woolsey’s grandfather (“I picture him sitting in it with a good cocktail”).

Campbell Lounge Chair

What really sells this, besides Woolsey’s handiwork, is how much choice you have in building it. You can configure it as an outdoor chair with Sunbrella fabric, or choose your preferred indoor upholstery: aged caramel leather, gold rush velvet, Missoni Purple, etc. You can even request a custom build with the material of your choice.

The frame itself is available in black, army green or vintage white.

The chair takes around 5-6 weeks to build, but you can save 10% on preorders now through the end of the month (use the code COMFY10).

While you’re waiting, a few other new Sean Woolsey items of note:

Pool table

The Woolsey Pool Table: “Rack your balls in style.” Black walnut rails and legs, rick black leather drop pockets, brass rail protectors, black pro tour felt. Badass, and comes with professional assembly included.

Teak Dreamer’s Chair: Your outdoor lounger, crafted out of Burmese Teak and featuring subtle, hand-carved indentations for your arms to rest on comfortably.

Bearer of the Hourglass: Part of Woolsey’s impressive artwork, these canvases are actually copper panels that utilize paints initially floated on the surface of carrageenan — the panels are then dunked in (a process called “marbling”), sealed with epoxy resin and framed in black walnut.

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