The Outdoor Adventurer’s Guide to Going All Electric

A zero-emissions approach to ATVing, biking, boating and more

By The Editors

 
The Outdoor Adventurer’s Guide to Going All Electric
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13 May 2016

There is something deeply contradictory about claiming to be an outdoor enthusiast while towing a trailer full of carbon-spewing machines into conservation-protected land.

But thanks to the increasingly prolific application of electric motors, you can now put your money where your motormouth is.

From chunky all-terrain skateboards to uber-quiet fishing boats to “the SUV of e-bikes,” here’s a look at the cream of the ecologically sound crop.

Trike
Although the Verrado Drift Trikes are advertised as being “more than just another Big Wheel,” that’s essentially what they are. Except these Big Wheels go up to 11 thanks to a 1,000W electric motor.

Board
Evolve’s Carbon series boards are lightweight, durable and controlled via a handheld Bluetooth device that works the throttle and puts accelerating and braking at your fingertips, not your feet.

Triborg
An all-terrain ride that looks straight out of Mad Max, the three-wheeled Triborg has a 900W electric motor and a laser-cut aluminum frame made to take any punishment you can dish out.

Bike
Part bicycle, part motorcycle and 100% "SUV e-bike,” the Moto Parilla Carbon can be powered by either a 250 or 500W motor and hit a max speed of 22 MPH. Get some.

Surfboard
Made from carbon fiber, the Lampuga doesn’t need waves for you to hang ten thanks to a 15 HP electric-drive motor that delivers speeds of up to 32 MPH for more than a half hour at a time.

Boat
Pure Watercraft is working to bring silent, fluid-free, Tesla-style electric motors that peak at 1,500 RPM and are capable of blasting 27-foot boats across bodies of water at nearly 21 MPH.

ATV
The Ranger EV from Polaris is a two-seat offroader packing a 30 HP motor with a range of 50 miles and a top speed of 25 MPH that’s powered by an extra-large battery pack that takes eight hours to charge.

Jet Ski
Hailing from Slovenia, the Quadrofoil is a sporty-looking watercraft that hits a max speed of 21 knots when foiling and can recharge its battery pack in less than two hours after a 50-mile cruise.

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