Revisit the Golden Age of Travel With This Incredibly Gorgeous Luggage Line

SteamLine: Luggage so nice it belongs in another century

By The Editors

SteamLine Just Made the Most Handsome Luggage of the Year
Share This

06 April 2016

The Golden Age of travel came with its own issues.

Astronomical ticket prices, smoking in the main cabin, limited entertainment options.

But it had a sense of style. And today, thanks to Reiss x SteamLine’s Grey Collection — a vintage-inspired luggage collab that recalls the best of a bygone travel era — that sense of style returns.

The new line marks the second collaboration between SteamLine, the NY-based luggage company, and Reiss, an international fashion brand.

SteamLine’s MO has been to “fuse travel and fashion” and create bags around different personas.

Here, they succeed in spades.

Part of their Correspondent series, Grey features two handmade bags with a similar construction: high-density fibreboard case, black leather straps, brushed metal accents with TSA-approved lock clips and an extendable aluminum handle. Inside: a beautiful striped lining and zipped interior pocket.

While it won’t weigh itself or send you a text when it arrives (like new-school bag makers Raden), SteamLine does a lot of its brainy work in hidden ways.

We took it out for a bit. It’s certainly sturdy and while it looks heavy, it’s actually remarkably featherweight (roughly 10-11 lbs., depending on the size). And the trolley wheels are super quiet and smooth.

It’s luggage you may not notice (a good thing), but other people will. The two bags — a Carry-on (18” x 13” x 7.5”, $710) and Stowaway ($745) — are just now being sold online and in Reiss stores.

Grey not your, ahem, bag? SteamLine also offers last year’s version of the line in black, as well as a beautiful line of hunter green bags and black vanity cases/stowaways (aka “The Diplomat”), a Japanese denim luggage set (“The Voyageur”) and a vegan leather set of cases (“The Entrepreneur”).

All good reasons to fly away for a bit. Even if things aren’t what they used to be.

The Specifics

SteamLine

Share This