Shipping Containers Started From the Bottom, Now They're Here

The Indonesian island of Lombok has a new landmark

By Alex Lauer

 
Shipping Containers Started From the Bottom, Now They're Here
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24 July 2017

Landing on Lombok, an Indonesian island directly east of Bali, one would expect a landscape of tropical bungalows —  at least something decidedly different from what we see here in the west. 

But wait, above the treeline ... it can’t be! Yes, it’s a shipping container. There’s no escape.

Banal design jokes aside, Budi Pradono and his architecture firm behind the residence have taken what is now a thoroughly hackneyed design element and made it striking again. Part of this is due to the location on a hill in Selong Belanak, an area in the southwest region known for its beaches, and part to its slanted placement which makes it seem on the verge of sliding right over the top.

Called Clay House, as noted by Dezeen, the walls were built with clay “collected 20 [kilometers]  from the site and treated by craftsmen with a mixture of sand, cement, straw and cow dung.” “Treated” being the operative word.

Clay House (5 images)

The shipping container itself was also locally sourced, taken from a port on a nearby island, and is now nestled around the master bedroom. The 60-degree angled ceiling creates an opening for an expanse of glass that offers views of the Indian Ocean, and doors that open onto a terrace. The en-suite bathroom gets a piece of the container and natural light as well.

Other features include lush greenery that seamlessly blends into the surrounding environment, a narrow swimming pool, a white exterior to ward off the heat and concrete stilts that push the abode above the trees.

"In the presence of this location on the hill of course we have to be careful because this building will automatically become an icon of the surrounding environment," the architects told Dezeen.

Seems odd to build a home like this, where you’re almost asking your neighbors to look up at you while you sip coffee on the balcony. But to each his own. 

Photos: Fernando Gomulya

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