Why the 'Official' James Bond Martini Is Not a Very Good One

On the semantics of 007's favorite cocktail

By Kirk Miller

 
Belvedere
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11 December 2017

“Shaken, not stirred.”

While the way James Bond prefers his martini is at odds with today’s bartending culture (you’re supposed to stir it ... and martinis should probably be gin-based), it hasn’t stopped Belvedere Vodka from crafting an official James Bond martini ... that is, yes, both shaken and vodka-based.

A collaboration with the UK film company EON Productions, the just-announced Official Belvedere 007 Martini is 60ml Belvedere Vodka, 10ml dry vermouth, “shaken, not stirred” and then finished with a lemon twist.

The 007 martini has been a staple of Ian Fleming’s Bond novels since 1956; it was first uttered in film by, ironically, villain Dr. No in the first Bond film (1962’s Dr. No) and finally by Sean Connery himself in 1964’s Goldfinger.

But here's a fun fact that, ahem, muddles the "official" title: Bond’s original choice of cocktail — according to Ian Fleming's first Bond novel Casino Royale — was actually a mix of gin, vodka and Kina Lillet. Fleming called it a Vesper Martini, after Vesper Lynd, the original Bond girl.

Here's an excerpt:

"A dry martini," [Bond] said. "One. In a deep champagne goblet."

"Oui, monsieur."
"Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?"
"Certainly, monsieur." The barman seemed pleased with the idea.

So, there you have it. If you're looking for an "original" 007 martini, Fleming spells it out step-by-step. Either way, you can still make it shaken, not stirred. 

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