Here’s Your Chance to Get Cone Mills Denim Jeans for Just $68

Jomers is introducing its first ever line of jeans

By Kirk Miller

Jomers
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05 March 2019

Before we rush to the jeans, a little history:

Jomers is a menswear brand that’ll sell you some incredibly natty suits for $250. The bad news: They’ll sell out of ‘em, sometimes in minutes. Credit or blame their lack of branding/marketing and extremely low production runs.

Which doesn’t take away from their quality. Nor does it make ‘em just another direct-to-consumer brand like Warby Parker, as Jomers CEO Meyer Dagmy explained to us a few years back. “Our model is essentially applying the Amazon model to a vertically integrated brand — meaning offering the same high quality product you'll find elsewhere but instead of ‘cutting out middlemen’ or skimping on detail, we just slash our own margin.”

The latest such margin slash is on their first domestically-sourced denim collection. The jeans are crafted from denim sourced from the legendary Cone Mills White Oak plant in North Carolina, which had over a century-long history — the scarcity of the product since its 2017 closure means you’ve had bargain brands like Wrangler selling jeans for $200 made with Cone Mills’ denim.

Jomers

The team at Jomers flew down to NC to purchase as much of the White Oak denim they could get their hands on to make this batch. The jeans, available in a slim or tailored fit, are made with a 13.25 oz 100% cotton fabric that’s single-rinsed to remove any staining or bleeding. As expected, there's no stitching on the back pockets or, as Dagmy notes, “any easily noticeable branding.”

It’s a clean look that puts the emphasis on the quality of the denim, yet the jeans are only $68.

And, for now, it’s our little secret: You can get them here a full two days before anyone else knows about ‘em.

Act quickly: Unlike your new denim, this isn’t gonna last a lifetime.

(Note: Not everything Jomers makes sells out in minutes. In stock they have a nice selection of Japanese shaggy flannel shirts and, yes, even a few $250 Italian wool suits.)

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