How (Not) to Lose a Million Dollars

You’ll need: One of these travel bags + one Faraday cage

By The Editors

How (Not) to Lose a Million Dollars
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17 February 2016

We recently told you how to spend $344,511.

Now, we’re going to tell you how to hide it.

With a little assist from SDR Traveller, makers of “ultra light, ultra strong, discreet luggage for the global traveller.”

Meaning: durable, lightweight bags that can transport up to $1 million in U.S. currency without leaving a trace, thanks to some ingenious tech and a magical material called “Cuben Fiber.”

Cuben Fiber is a waterproof, lightweight and ripstop laminate four times stronger than kevlar at half the weight (as well as resistant to UV light and 100% waterproof).

A stiff material, it gets a bit crinkly over time, offering the bags an interesting, well, patina. But also safety.

This fiber makes up all the stealthy duffels and carry-ons offered by SDR, a company run by Studio D, aka Studio Dradiodurans, an SF-based international research institute named after Deinococcus Radiodurans, an “extremophilic bacteria that can survive acid, drought and has extraordinary tolerance to radiation.”

SDR’s 1M Hauly Heist comes equipped with a removable Heist Pouch, which SDR describes as a “RF-shielded Faraday cage” that prevents radio frequency tracking to and from phones, laptops, GPS, etc. So it’s great for storing electronics as well.

Resembling a minimalist waterproof day pack with a shoulder strap, the Hauly features a double roll-top enclosure that’s also great for rapid loading, which is ”ideal in situations where time is of the essence.” Plus, a loop handle big enough for a large, gloved hand (cue spy thriller music here).

The inspiration for the 1M (which, yes, does hold up to a million dollars in bills) comes from, as the company notes, working in places “that have unconventional rule of law,” be it border guards, random checkpoints or off-the-grid scenarios. Given their simple appearance, the bags are designed not to be noticed.

The Heist, which requires three weeks for construction and testing, also comes in 10, 100 and 400K sizes. The company offers similarly minded passport pouches, tamper-evident accounting sleeves and the D3 Traveler, a light, discreet duffel that packs down into the size of a sweater.

What you do with or what you put in these bags?

That’s your business. And now, it’ll stay that way.

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