Travel | October 2, 2021 5:31 am

A Resort That’s Literally Built Into an Arabian Mountain Is Underway

The suites will be built of the rock excavated from the mountainside during construction

The Desert Rock Project
The Desert Rock Project
Luxigon

Remember in Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit when the characters would happen upon some great big mountain and then find a secret door that revealed a massive network of rooms and corridors hidden inside of it?

There’s now a five-star, eco-friendly hotel being built in Saudi Arabia that is exactly that.

According to a new report from New Atlas, construction has officially begun on a new luxury resort that will be — quite literally — built into an Arabian mountainside.

The brainchild of Oppenheim Architecture, the resort — which has been coined the Desert Rock project — will boast 48 villas, a dozen suites, a spa and fitness center, several remote dining areas and a lagoon oasis. Obviously. One of the most interesting facets of its design is that much of the rock that will be excavated during construction will then be repurposed to build the suites.

The Desert Rock Project
The Desert Rock Project
Luxigon

“The project defines new territory for sustainability and sustainable tourism at every level; across planning, construction, and operation. Most construction materials will be recycled from the site, so that building impact is minimal and new forms embody the same colors and minerals as their surroundings,” Oppenheim Architecture’s website reads. “Dispersed facilities minimize the resort’s footprint and invite wider site exploration, adventure, and discovery; introducing guests to all the cultural, archeological, and geological dimensions of this awe-inspiring place. “

While they’re still very much in the early stages of the building process, according to New Atlas, the Desert Rock project is already expected to receive the LEED certification — a distinction based on the most widely used green-building rating system in the world — for features that include a rainwater collection systems for irrigation and the volume of recycled stone and sand that will be used for its construction.

“Guests will enter the resort through a hidden valley nestled between the mountains,” Oppenheim Architecture said. “Most roads leading into the resort will follow the edge of the main wadi, hidden behind landscape mounds, to provide uninterrupted views. This will also minimize sound and light pollution, allowing guests to fully absorb the surrounding dramatic desert landscape.”

On top of enjoying unparalleled views of the Arabian desert and staying in a state-of-the-art architectural masterpiece, guests will also have access to a whole host of activities, including hiking and dune buggies.

The resort is currently slated to open in 2023.