By Evan Bleier / March 19, 2019

Prosecutors Offer to Drop Prostitution Charges Against Robert Kraft

But the Patriots owner would have to admit he would be found guilty at trial.

New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft with the Vince Lombardi Trophy during the Victory Parade through the streets of Boston on February 5, 2019, in Boston, Massachusetts to celebrate winning Super Bowl LIII. (Photo by Richard Cashin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft with the Vince Lombardi Trophy during the Victory Parade through the streets of Boston on February 5, 2019, in Boston, Massachusetts to celebrate winning Super Bowl LIII. (Photo by Richard Cashin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Charged with two misdemeanor counts of soliciting prostitution in connection with a massive human-trafficking sting operation in Florida, Patriots owner Robert Kraft is being offered a way to get off without a conviction.

According to The Wall Street JournalFlorida prosecutors have offered to drop the charges against Kraft if he agrees to admit he would have been found guilty at trial.

Under the terms of the deal, which has also been offered to other alleged johns who were charged following the sting, Kraft would have to complete an education course about prostitution, do 100 hours of community service, submit to screening for sexually transmitted diseases, any pay court fees.

Kraft has always maintained his innocence in the case and has already entered a not guilty plea in advance of a trial.

To defend him at a potential trial, Kraft has recruited defense attorneys Alex Spiro and William Burck as well as Jeffrey Goldberger, the criminal defense lawyer who helped New York businessman Jeffrey Epstein get a “sweetheart deal” after being charged with creating a sex ring of underage girls.

The former federal prosecutor who helped negotiate that deal for the state, Alexander Acosta, was nominated as U.S. secretary of labor by President Trump (an acquaintance of Epstein).

With a legal team like that with ties to such high places, it makes some sense prosecutors want to avoid a trial with regard to Kraft.