Monitors show imagery from security cameras seen at the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative on April 23, 2013 in New York City. At the counter-terrorism center, police and private security personnel monitor more than 4,000 surveillance cameras and license plate readers mounted around the Financial District and surrounding parts of Lower Manhattan. Designed to identify potential threats it is modeled after London's "Ring of Steel" system.  (John Moore/Getty Images)
Monitors show imagery from security cameras seen at the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative on April 23, 2013 in New York City. At the counter-terrorism center, police and private security personnel monitor more than 4,000 surveillance cameras and license plate readers mounted around the Financial District and surrounding parts of Lower Manhattan. Designed to identify potential threats it is modeled after London's "Ring of Steel" system. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Crime prediction is here. But, does make for better police officers?

Most major police departments use crime-predicting software to determine where to place officers and, in some cases, who might be a suspect.

Using historical crime statistics, artificial intelligence can help police departments better distribute its officers to areas that are more likely to experience criminal activity at times when they are most likely to occur.

CivicScape, started by a seven-year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, is used by nine of the nation’s 35 most populous cities, according to Bloomberg. The company made headlines in March when it made its code available for anyone to review for any possible biases.

Camden County Police Department officer Vidal Rivera is seen on foot patrol in Camden, New Jersey, on May 24, 2017. Camden is one CivicScape’s clients. Police reform and falling crime statistics turned Camden into a poster child for better policing. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

However, the data-driven technology is not without its critics.

Civil-liberties advocates argue the software relies on statistics from decades of biased policing in minority neighborhoods, reflecting socioeconomic disparity often found in cities. Some groups say crime prediction violates the U.S. Constitution. Meanwhile, many cops dismiss the software as pseudoscience sold to desperate department heads that might be too eager to rely on technology to give them an edge over criminals.