SICILY, ITALY - FEBRUARY 28: Mount Etna, spewing strombolian explosions on February 28, 2017 in Sicily, Italy.

Mount Etna in Sicily, Italy is erupting after being mostly dormant for the last two years. Considered one of the most active volcanos in the world, it blew its top and spewed bright orange lava into the sky on Monday night. There is no direct danger to the towns or airport on the island but authorities will continue to monitor the growing ash cloud.

PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Images

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SICILY, ITALY - FEBRUARY 28: Mount Etna, spewing strombolian explosions on February 28, 2017 in Sicily, Italy. Mount Etna in Sicily, Italy is erupting after being mostly dormant for the last two years. Considered one of the most active volcanos in the world, it blew its top and spewed bright orange lava into the sky on Monday night. There is no direct danger to the towns or airport on the island but authorities will continue to monitor the growing ash cloud. PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com - New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com - New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftimages.com (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Mount Etna
Eruption of Mt. Etna, Italy. (Marco Restivo Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

 

A BBC camera crew was among the group of tourists that escaped an eruption of Mount Etna, Europe’s tallest active volcano, when it erupted on Thursday.

 

The BBC team was on site to observe volcanic activity at Etna, which has been spewing ash plumes and lava in recent weeks. Perhaps underestimating the danger, the BBC team and others had to make a mad dash to a rescue vehicle when one of Etna’s craters suddenly erupted. BBC global science correspondent Rebecca Morelle later Tweeted that they were “running down a mountain pelted by rocks, dodging burning boulders and boiling steam” to escape, adding that “explosions like this have killed.”

 

BBC reports that the incident was a phreatic explosion, in which flowing lava makes contact with snow and ice. The explosion occurred at a sufficient altitude (9,500 feet) to hurl blistering hot rocks and steam down the side of the volcano.

Ten people were injured by the explosion, but none seriously, and there were no fatalities.

RealClearLife