Advice | October 3, 2016 9:00 am

It’s Official: Your “Smart” Fridge Can Be Infected by Porn

And other, graver dangers that come with a connected home

In theory, it’s great that you can control everything in your house from your smartphone.

In practice, though, the inevitable can and will happen: your house will end up infected with tons of porn. Witness: On Sunday, antivirus software guru/bath salts enthusiast John McAfee tweeted a photo from Home Depot of a smart fridge … connected to Pornhub.

While this revelation finally answers the question, “What use is a smart fridge?”, the pic does bring up Skynet-like implications. In your Internet of Things future, everything in your house will be connected — be it your your thermostat (Nest), lights (Philips Hue) or coffeemaker (Nespresso) … not to mention security cameras or alarm systems.

Which means all of those devices are hackable. In its second-season premiere, Mr. Robot previewed a version of this dark IoT future when Darlene and fsociety easily took charge of the connected home of Susan Jacobs, the general counsel for E Corp. Freezing temps and general discomfort followed.

“This scenario is entirely possible,” Corey Nachreiner told GeekWire, where the WatchGuard Technologies CTO has been reviewing the USA show from a hacker/security angle. “Although few smart homes are as integrated as that one, many of the home automation systems highlighted are available on the market. Many of the companies creating [IoT devices] aren’t traditional computer or software companies. As a result, many of the latest connected devices aren’t designed with security in mind.”

Hacked IoT devices have already launched severe DDoS attacks, and you may remember recent news about a Tesla Model S getting hacked from 12 miles away. Or a “smart” vibrator that was remotely activated. Or a Wi-Fi-enabled TrackingPoint sniper rifle.

Consider the porn fridge a warning.